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Dry Age Related Macular Degeneration

Dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common form of this disease. The cells of the macula decay and disintegrate. Clinical trials are currently being undertaken using drugs to slow progression of the disease and and AI trial is working on finding a way to identify those at risk of developing this devastating condition.

Studies suggest that people who eat a diet rich in carotenoids (powerful antioxidants) have a lower risk of developing AMD. Vegetables that include these important antioxidants are raw carrot, kale, brussels sprouts, raw spinach, corn, broccoli, green peas, green beans, tomatoes, peppers and lettuce. Our research team have also found evidence that an 'unhealthy' diet can be detrimental to vision.

Vitamins

There is no evidence to date that taking vitamins when there are no clinical signs of disease will prevent age-related macular degeneration.

It is thought that they may help to slow the disease in some people with early - to mid-stage AMD. Viteyes 2 softgels are available from pharmacies.

Smoking is a major risk factor for both wet and dry macular degeneration. If at all possible patients should stop or reduce smoking.